Connect with us

News

ATN vs YGB Live Score Dream11 Prediction Lineup Timing Champions League Atalanta vs Young Boys

Published

on


Craze of football is going to the next level and we can expect more from the current league. Yes, the most popular football league Champion League is ready to serve another square in few hours. The upcoming football match will be played between Atalanta (ATN) vs Young Boys (YGB).

atn vs ygb

These are the two warrior teams who have played such numbers of matches throughout the league and you can’t imagine how much they have served through the past matches. Fans are excited to watch this fresh square off which will take place on 29th September 2021. The timing of the match and other details like probable players, match prediction and live score are available here.

ATN vs YGB Live Score

Match: Atalanta vs Young Boys
League: Champions League
Date: Wednesday, September 29, 2021
Time: 10:15 PM IST
Venue: Gewiss Stadium, Bergamo

We have data on the last five matches for both teams. According to the available data, they won several matches which were unexpected because of the huge score. Although, team ATN has defeated the opponent successfully. They have maintained the momentum of winning many matches. Possibly they will maintain the same level of performance in the upcoming match also.

While if we talk about the team YGB then we want to tell you some more amazing details like what are the strategies they are following and how many matches they played. As per the data, YGB has played some matches where they have performed very well. The performance by them is expecting by fans in this upcoming match also. Now it will be amazing if they bring the same thriller gameplay in this square-off also. Let me know further information like match probable players and winning prediction.

Atalanta (ATN) Possible Playing 11: 1.Juan Musso, 2.Rafael Toloi, 3.Jose Luis Palomino, 4.Merih Demiral, 5.Davide Zappacosta, 6.Robin Gosens, 7.Marten de Roon, 8.Matteo Pessina, 9.Remo Freuler, 10.Ruslan Malinovskyi, 11.Duvan Zapata

Young Boys (YGB) Possible Playing 11: 1.David Von Ballmoos, 2.Ulisses Garcia, 3.Mohamed Camara, 4.Silvan Hefti, 5.Christopher Martins, 6.Moumi Ngamaleu, 7.Vincent Sierro, 8.Christian Fassnacht, 9.Michel Aebischer, 10.Sandro Lauper, 11.Elia Meschak

According to the knowledge and stats after recently played games we have a prediction that the upcoming match will be win by Atlanta (ATN). Now it will be amazing to watch them in a new avatar. You can watch this match on the regular broadcaster match or if you want to know only the live score then you can get the live updates of this match here.



Source link

News

Guillain-​Barré Syndrome Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination – The Maravi Post

Published

on

By


Disclaimer: Early release articles are not considered as final versions. Any changes will be reflected in the online version in the month the article is officially released.

Author affiliations: Keelung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan (S.-C. Shao, C.-H. Wang, M.-J. Hung, S.-C. Liao); National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan (S.-C. Shao, K-C, Chang); Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (K.-C. Chang, H.-Y. Chen); Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan (M.-J. Hung, S.-C. Liao)

Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), an immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy with a ≈5% mortality rate, has an incidence worldwide of 0.81–1.91 cases/100,000 person-years (1). GBS has been reported to be associated with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccination, but a comprehensive summary regarding this rare adverse event is still lacking. To determine clinical features of GBS associated with COVID-19 vaccination, we conducted hospital-based investigations in Taiwan along with a systematic review of published case reports.

We analyzed electronic medical records data from Taiwan’s largest multi-institutional healthcare system, including 9 branches of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (2), where healthcare workers received first-priority COVID-19 ChAdOx1-S vaccine (Oxford/AstraZeneca, https://www.astrazeneca.com) starting March 22, 2021. We included healthcare workers vaccinated during March 22–May 31 and followed them for 30 days after vaccination. We identified GBS cases on the basis of code G610 from the International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification, or spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting systems within the hospitals. Two authors (C.H.W. and S.C.L.) confirmed diagnosis and classification of GBS cases through chart reviews (3,4). This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Chang Gung Medical Foundation (approval no. 202101087B0).

To summarize clinical features of published cases from literature, we searched PubMed and Embase for reports posted through August 17, 2021, using relevant key terms such as “COVID-19,” “Guillain-​Barré syndrome,” and “vaccine” with suitable MeSH terms. Two independent reviewers (S.C.S., C.H.W.) performed the study selection and data extraction; a third-reviewer (S.C.L.) settled any differences between them. We excluded cases with coexisting COVID-19 or preexisting GBS. We included only publications with reports of clinical features related to GBS. We described basic characteristics, laboratory data, pathologic reports, treatment patterns, and prognosis of GBS cases associated with COVID-19 vaccination. The study protocol of this systematic review is published on PROSPERO (https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.php?RecordID=265479).

We included 18,269 healthcare workers (mean age 40.6 years, range 18–87 years; 67.5% were women) who received ChAdOx1-S vaccine during the study period. After these 18,257 first-dose and 544 second-dose vaccinations, we identified 1 GBS case after a first dose of ChAdOx1-S vaccine in 1 of the hospitals participating in the study.

Figure

Systematic review of published literature in study of Guillain-​Barré syndrome associated with coronavirus vaccination, 2021. GBS, Guillain-​Barré syndrome.

Figure. Systematic review of published literature in study of Guillain-​Barré syndrome associated with coronavirus vaccination, 2021. GBS, Guillain-​Barré syndrome.

After a systematic review of published literature (Figure), we included 17 publications reporting an additional 38 cases of GBS related to COVID-19 vaccination (India, 10 cases; United Kingdom, 11 cases; Mexico, 7 cases; United States, 3 cases; France, 1 case; Italy, 3 cases; Malta, 1 case; Turkey, 1 case; and Qatar, 1 case) (Appendix Table). Including the case in Taiwan, these 39 cases occurred in persons with a mean age of 57.8 (range 20–86) years; 56.4% were male. Most of the reported case-patients received ChAdOx1-S (25/39), followed by BNT162b2 (12/39) (Pfizer-BioNTech, https://www.pfizer.com), Ad26.COV2.S (1/39) (Johnson & Johnson, https://www.jnj.com), and CoronaVac (1/39) (Sinovac Biotech, http://www.sinovac.com). The GBS rate after COVID-19 vaccination ranged from 1.8 to 53.2 cases/1 million doses. The initial symptoms of GBS included myalgia (12/39), paraparesis (5/39), quadriparesis (22/39), paresthesia (28/39), and facial palsy (23/39), and symptoms of dysautonomia also were observed during hospitalizations (3/39). The average time from vaccination to symptom onset was 11.3 days. A total of 34 case-patients received lumbar puncture; 30 had manifestations of albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid.

On the basis of the clinical diagnostic classification of GBS, we found that most case-patients had the classic form (22/39), followed by bilateral facial palsy with paresthesia (12/39), the paraparetic form (4/39), and GBS–Miller Fisher syndrome overlap variant (1/39). We defined all classic and paraparetic forms of GBS (26/26) as level 1 or 2 on the basis of the Brighton criteria (5). We identified the GBS subtype in 33/39 cases by electrophysiological examination; most reported case-patients had a diagnosis of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (23/33), followed by acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (4/33) and acute motor axonal neuropathy (3/33). For GBS management, 33 case-patients received intravenous immunoglobulin and 2 received plasmapheresis. One case-patient died; 9 case-patients required mechanical ventilation during hospitalization. The scores on the GBS disability scale (5) were only available for 30 cases; 12 scored >4 (i.e., indicating bedridden or chair-bound status) during follow-up or after discharge.

Similar to previous reviews on GBS associated with COVID-19, we found that both COVID-19 and COVID-19 vaccination mostly cause the classic form of GBS (under the clinical diagnosis classification) and the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy subtype (based on electrodiagnostic features) within 2 weeks of infection or vaccination (68). However, the bilateral facial palsy with paresthesia variant and initial onset symptoms of facial diplegia were more frequently found in GBS case-patients after COVID-19 vaccination.

Case series and reports can indicate safety issues and outline clinical features of diseases, but they cannot establish robust causal relationships between COVID-19 vaccination and GBS. Despite the benefits (e.g., increase in the number of persons not susceptible to infection and decrease in severe outcomes after infection) of COVID-19 vaccination far outweighing the potentially severe adverse events after infection (9), our findings highlight the need for vigilance in patients with neurologic symptoms after COVID-19 vaccination and for postvaccination surveillance programs to assess causality of GBS.

Dr. Shao is a clinical pharmacist at Keelung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. His research interests include the use of systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize current best evidence on clinical topics, specifically in regard to complications in COVID-19 patients.

Top

The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors’ affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.

Continue Reading

News

SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 Variant Infection in Malayan Tigers, Virginia, USA – The Maravi Post

Published

on

By


Disclaimer: Early release articles are not considered as final versions. Any changes will be reflected in the online version in the month the article is officially released.

Author affiliations: Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA (P.K. Mitchell, M. Martins, L.C. Caserta, R.R. Anderson, B.D. Cronk, E.L. Goodrich, D.G. Diel); Virginia Zoo, Norfolk, Virginia, USA (T. Reilly); Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia (J. Murphy)

On April 4, 2021, a 5-year-old male Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni) at the Virginia Zoo (Norfolk, VA, USA) began exhibiting lethargy, labored breathing, coughing, intermittent upper respiratory sounds, hyporexia, and mucoid nasal discharge. On April 7, another 5-year-old male Malayan tiger began experiencing labored breathing, cough, clear nasal discharge, and hyporexia. On April 10, a third Malayan tiger, a 10-year-old male, had cough and later clear nasal discharge. The tigers’ clinical signs resolved by April 15, eleven days after the outbreak began.

Zoo staff collected nasal swab and fecal samples from the 5-year-old tigers on April 9 and the 10-year-old tiger on April 13 and submitted these to Cornell University’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC; Ithaca, NY, USA). AHDC tested samples for Bordetella sp., Chlamydia felis, Mycoplasma cynos, M. felis, Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus, influenza virus, pneumovirus, feline calicivirus, and feline herpesvirus; all results were negative. All samples tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by EZ-SARS-CoV-2 Real-Time RT-PCR Test (Tetracore, Inc., https://tetracore.com). We isolated SARS-CoV-2 from respiratory and fecal specimens from the first tiger. Testing at the US Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Services Laboratories (Ames, IA, USA) confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. We screened the tiger samples using TaqPath COVID-19 RT-PCR Kit (Thermo Fisher Scientific, https://www.thermofisher.com), which revealed a spike gene dropout in samples from all 3 tigers; only the nucleoprotein and open reading frame 1ab gene targets were detected, suggesting B.1.1.7 variant infection.

Figure

Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 from 3 Malayan tigers, Virginia, USA. Tiger samples are numbered in order of symptom onset. A) Subset of phylogenetic tree showing parent (G23236T) and grandparent (C4900T) nodes of the tiger sequences, with tips labeled as states of origin in the United States or Australia. B) Phylogenetic tree showing that other B.1.1.7 viruses detected in Virginia that contain the K558N mutation are not epidemiologically related to the sequences detected in tigers 1, 2, and 3. SNP, single-nucleotide polymorphism.

Figure. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 from 3 Malayan tigers, Virginia, USA. Tiger samples are numbered in order of symptom onset. A) Subset of phylogenetic tree…

We performed whole-genome sequencing on all samples by using MinION (Oxford Nanopore Technologies, https://nanoporetech.com), as previously described (1). We assembled reads using the ARTIC ncov-2019 protocol (ARTIC Network, https://artic.network) and Medaka (Oxford Nanopore Technologies) for variant calling. We obtained near-complete (29,702–29,710-bp) assemblies from all nasal swab specimens (GenBank accession nos. MZ305031–3) but no assemblies from fecal samples. We identified respiratory specimen genomes as lineage B.1.1.7 (Alpha variant) by using Pangolin version 2.4.2 (https://github.com/cov-lineages/pangolin). We used Nextstrain (https://nextstrain.org) for phylogenetic analysis of tiger-derived sequences and other B.1.1.7 sequences downloaded from GISAID (https://www.gisaid.org) on April 15, 2021 (2,3). Tiger-derived sequences all were identical, except 1 manually corrected homopolymer repeat error, and fell into a clade defined by a C4900T mutation containing other samples collected primarily in the United States. Tiger-derived sequences differed from others in the clade by 1 single-nucleotide polymorphism in the spike gene (K558N) (Figure, panel A). Using the vdb tool (4), we found 46 additional B.1.1.7 sequences that had the K558N mutation in GISAID on July 22, 2021; all were collected from Virginia during March 27–July 7, 2021. However, phylogenetic analysis of these sequences and the tiger-derived sequences showed divergence of 11 single-nucleotide polymorphism, minus the divergence producing the K558N mutation (Figure, panel B), indicating the sequences are not related epidemiologically.

The source of the tigers’ infection is unknown. The zoo has been open to the public, but transmission from a visitor is unlikely because tiger exhibit areas are separated from visitors by either a glass enclosure or >9 m distance. The most plausible explanation is that >1 tiger acquired the virus from a keeper because they had close contact. However, no employees tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 nor had symptoms during the 4 weeks before the tigers’ symptom onset. Nine keepers were responsible for the animals’ daily care; 2 other persons prepared animal diets daily. Employees were required to wear facemasks always, indoors and outdoors; everyone wore standard 2-ply surgical masks or homemade cloth facemasks. Staff also were required to wear gloves when handling and preparing food and when servicing animal areas. Furthermore, staff were required to step into an accelerated hydrogen peroxide disinfectant footbath when entering the tiger building and diet kitchen. The 3 tigers might have been infected by an employee, or 1 tiger was infected, then transmission occurred to the others. Two tigers lived in the same enclosure and had no direct contact with the third, but all 3 rotated through common enclosure spaces.

After identification of the tiger infections, 4 additional zoo animals were tested: 1 lion (Panthera leo) with lethargy and hyporexia ≈1 week after SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis in the tigers; another asymptomatic lion because of age and proximity to the first lion; and 2 degus (Octodon degus) that died in late March and had interstitial pneumonia on necropsy. AHDC tested nasal swab samples from the lions and frozen spleen and cecum samples from the degus by reverse transcription PCR; all results were negative for SARS-CoV-2.

Our findings underscore felid susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2, which also has been detected in captive snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and pumas (Puma concolor) (5). Other nonhuman species, including gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), minks (Neovison vison), and ferrets (Mustela putorius furo), have acquired SARS-CoV-2; additional species have been shown to be susceptible experimentally (57). Domestic cats and dogs in the United Kingdom and United States reportedly had B.1.1.7 infections, suggesting that mutations characterizing this lineage are not constrained to a host range (8; L. Ferasin et al., unpub. data, https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.03.18.435945). Monitoring animals for SARS-CoV-2 infection is critical to determining potential host range, particularly as new virus variants emerge and spread.

Dr. Mitchell is a research associate in the Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences at Cornell University. His primary research interest is molecular epidemiology of infectious diseases.

Top

The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors’ affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.

Continue Reading

News

Subclinical Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection Associated with Travel to the British Virgin Islands – The Maravi Post

Published

on

By


Disclaimer: Early release articles are not considered as final versions. Any changes will be reflected in the online version in the month the article is officially released.

Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (C.M. Dewart, J.E. Gee, M.G. Elrod, C.A. Gulvik, J.S. Salzer, L. Liu); Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, Ohio, USA (C.M. Dewart, S. Nowicki, S. de Fijter); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA (F.A. Almeida, C. Koval)

Burkholderia pseudomallei is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus and the etiologic agent of melioidosis (1). The clinical signs and symptoms of melioidosis are varied, and subclinical infection can occur with or without latent clinical manifestation (13). Infection with B. pseudomallei typically is associated with environmental exposure through inhalation or direct contact with contaminated soil or water (1,3). The incubation period can vary from a few days in acute infection to months or years in latent infection, making identification of the exposure source challenging (1). Most melioidosis cases are reported in northern Australia and Southeast Asia; however, the known and predicted geographic distribution of B. pseudomallei continues to be characterized (1,3,4). We report identification of subclinical B. pseudomallei infection by endobronchial ultrasound–transbronchial needle aspiration. We show that phylogenetic analysis of the clinical isolate combined with patient interview were integral to determining a probable location of exposure because the patient traveled to multiple B. pseudomallei–endemic regions. This project was reviewed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and determined to be nonresearch.

In 2018, a female Ohio resident >65 years of age underwent tooth and torus mandibularis removal after several months of recurrent maxillary molar tooth pain and infections. An oral ulceration was noted, and a biopsy proved it was a squamous cell carcinoma. During her evaluation to undergo maxillectomy and hard palate resection, combined positron emission tomography–computed tomography imaging demonstrated a fluorodeoxyglucose-avid precarinal station 4R lymph node and fluorodeoxyglucose avidity in the right hard palate, consistent with her known malignancy. The patient reported some discomfort at the right upper palate and a sore throat but otherwise had a preserved appetite and weight and denied any chest pain, dyspnea, hemoptysis, fever, chills, or night sweats. She underwent an endobronchial ultrasound–transbronchial needle aspiration, at which time the 4R node was sampled a dozen times. Because a rapid onsite cytology examination failed to demonstrate any malignant cells, additional samples were obtained for routine gram, fungal, and acid-fast bacilli stains and cultures. Scant colonies of B. pseudomallei grew on culture media several days after the bronchoscopy, and preliminary identification was made by using VITEK 2 (bioMérieux, https://www.biomerieux.com).

Results from automated systems in clinical laboratories can misidentify B. pseudomallei as a variety of other bacteria and are not confirmatory for this bacterium. Even 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be inadequate depending on the segment queried (1). The Ohio Department of Health Laboratory confirmed B. pseudomallei by using CDC’s Laboratory Response Network algorithm (https://emergency.cdc.gov/lrn/index.asp).

Because the patient could not tolerate optimal eradication therapy (5), she received intensive therapy with intravenous meropenem for 14 days, then completed a 3-month course of oral doxycycline. Computed tomography images shortly after completing the treatment course showed no evidence of active infection.

During interviews with public health officials, the patient reported traveling to the British Virgin Islands (BVI) twice a year for ≈3 weeks at a time and had visited 2–3 months before the identification of lymphadenitis. She also reported trips of <1 month duration to China and Singapore, where B. pseudomallei is endemic, within the previous 10 years (1,3). No known exposures to B. pseudomallei were reported. However, she recalled landscaping activities in BVI that resulted in noticeable dust in her residence, but she did not know on which BVI visit this exposure to aerosolized soil occurred.

Figure

Dendrogram of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolated in a patient who traveled to the British Virgin Islands, 2018. Bold text indicates patient isolate; reference genomes predominantly are from the Western Hemisphere. The tree was generated by using MEGA 7.0 software (http://www.megasoftware.net). Single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis was performed by using Parsnp in the Harvest 1.3 package (https://github.com/marbl/harvest). Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site.

Figure. Dendrogram of Burkholderia pseudomalleiisolated in a patient who traveled to the British Virgin Islands, 2018. Bold text indicates patient isolate; reference genomes predominantly are from the Western Hemisphere….

CDC performed whole-genome sequencing of the patient’s B. pseudomallei isolate, OH2018, for comparison to reference genomes that have well-established geographic origins. The isolate’s genome sequence is available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) under Bioproject accession no. PRJNA575632. Multilocus sequence typing classified the isolate as sequence type 92, which previously has been observed in several isolates originating from the Western Hemisphere (6,7). Phylogenetic single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis demonstrated OH2018 groups with reference genomes from the Caribbean, especially the US Virgin Islands and BVI (Figure).

Whole-genome sequencing of the isolate was essential to determining potential exposure risk because the patient traveled to multiple regions where B. pseudomallei is endemic. The patient likely was exposed to B. pseudomallei in BVI 2–3 months before infection was identified, as ascertained through molecular epidemiology and supported by her report of travel and exposure to aerosolized soil in this location. The case provides additional evidence that B. pseudomallei is endemic to the Caribbean and, more specifically, BVI, where reported infections are limited. Only 1 other infection associated with BVI has been reported in the literature (8), and no environmental isolates have been reported. To support prompt identification and treatment for melioidosis, clinicians and public health officials should be aware of this geographic distribution when considering possible infection among persons with compatible travel history.

Dr. Dewart is a registered nurse and infectious disease epidemiologist. She served as a CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service officer during 2019–2021 and is currently a field assignee to the Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, Ohio, USA, through CDC’s Center for Preparedness and Response. Her primary research interests include healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial resistance.

Top

The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors’ affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 PRUMETRICS