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Ken Saro-Wiwa And Ogoni Eight V. Fulani Butchers By Bayo Oluwasanmi – The Maravi Post

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The murder of Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight Ogoni environmental activists in 1995 is a gentle reminder that the greatest threat to a safe, orderly, peaceful, democratic, and prosperous Nigeria are the Fulani Butchers – past and present rulers of Nigeria.

Ken Saro-Wiwa and Ogoni eight environmental activists were executed by the gap-tooth dictator Sanni Abacha for waging a non-violent campaign against the Royal Dutch Shell Company and the Nigerian government over pollution, economic injustices, and destruction of life of Ogoni people.

Ibrahim Agboola Gambari, Chief of Staff to Buhari, Hameed Ibrahim Ali, Comptroller of the Nigerian Customs Service, President of the Nigerian Bar Association, Joseph Daudu, and Justice Ibrahim    Auta, retired Chief Judge of Nigeria were accomplices in the murder of Saro-Wiwa and the eight Ogoni. 

The records of northern politicians who served as presidents or military heads of state and those Fulani who served in high visibility positions, are by and large, evil people. Why is it that presidents of northern extraction are bigots, tyrants, dictators, murderers? Why is it that they despise rule of law, freedom, fairness, justice? Why are they so crude, barbaric, demonic, blood thirsty, and so alien to democracy? Why do they want to make all Nigerians Muslims? Though the Fulanis have nowhere to claim as their home or origin, they are determined to make Nigeria a Fulani country. Why? What the hell is wrong with these people?



Any time a northerner is president, our democracy is destroyed by replacing it with anarchy. They unleash terror on Nigerians. They exhibit brute dominance. They employ terrorism to achieve their Fulani political and religious agendas. The Butcher Sanni Abacha killed Ken Saro-Wiwa and the eight Ogoni activists. The aged despot Ibrahim Babangida killed Dele Giwa, one of our best and brightest investigative journalists. Babangida annulled the freest and fairest election won by MKO Abiola. Abiola was eventually murdered by Babangida. And today, Muhammadu Buhari, The Butcher of Aso Rock, continues in the tyrannical tradition of his despotic predecessors. What’s wrong with these Fulanis?

These Fulanis are skilled in deception and manipulation. They are selfish and inconsiderate with no qualms hurting or killing other ethnic groups for their selfish political motives. Is government not supposed to punish evildoers? Is government not expected to ensure and guard freedom and liberty of citizens? Instead, the Fulani administrations from independence to date protects those who do evil and punishes those who do good. It is obvious that Buhari government has designed a culture that protects criminals, terrorists, and kills those who fight to protect their own people. 

We civilized Yorubas cannot continue to live with Fulani Butchers. There’s higher meaning and purpose for our lives than to be fighting cows, terrorists, and tyrants. We have the right to choose where we want to live and how we want to be governed. We have the right to nurture and preserve our culture, traditions, and values. We cannot live a full and fulfilling life under a repressive and blood thirsty Fulani Butchers. Elections are not the answer. We cannot hold any election with the fraudulent 1999 Constitution. There will be no elections in 2023 without a referendum based on one simple question: Do we (Yorubas and others fighting for self-determination) want to be part of Nigeria or not? This is the question that will determine the corporate existence of Nigeria. 

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How ‘I am waiting to see almost killed me’ – The Maravi Post

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By Murielle E.

Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), 29th November 2021 -/African Media Agency (AMA)/- I am Murielle. Former beauty queen. Executive. Mother of three. If there is one thing that characterises me at first sight, it is elegance. I’m always dressed to the nines, perched on high heels. I am the kind of woman you meet in the big African capitals. I should also mention that I am in my fifties. I’m not saying any of this out of pride. I tell you this so that you understand what follows

Here is my story. 

Not long ago, I was like some of you: sceptical about the COVID-19 vaccine. I thought I would wait, observe how things played out, then make up my own mind about whether to get it. When a friend’s husband told us that he had received two doses of the vaccine, I thought to myself: let’s see if he develops any side effects.

So I waited. But everything changed one afternoon in September. It began with the typical malaria symptoms : cold, aches, fever. But soon, I had trouble breathing. I was literally suffocating.

Seeing that I was in bad shape, my eldest son decided to call an ambulance. I was taken to a private clinic in Abidjan. They ran some tests. Soon, the diagnosis was in : COVID-19. After analysis, it turned out that I had the Delta variant, which is not covered by health insurance providers in Ivory Coast. I had to pay a deposit before I could be treated. Half-conscious and unable to pay the amount requested, my family rallied together to raise the funds so that I could be admitted. I was in the hospital for a full 10 days. I left exhausted, out of breath, and financially depleted since I had to pay the balance for treatment before I could be released from the hospital. 

I’m better today – but I’m far from fully recovered. In fact, the hardest part of this experience is the after effects I still have—especially the breathlessness, despite undergoing aerosol rehabilitation sessions. But I’m grateful that I have my life.

Today, I am passionate about encouraging people to get vaccinated. It’s true that the vaccine doesn’t guarantee that you won’t contract COVID-19. But, it is still the surest way to avoid severe forms of the disease. According to statistics, not only are the vaccines more than 90 per cent effective in preventing hospitalizations and death, they also meet the safety and efficacy criteria established by the WHO and have received the required regulatory approval. 

If you’re like me and waiting to see, my message to you is simple : Please don’t wait. Don’t learn the hard way. Don’t wait until it’s too late.

This article is part of a series on vaccination in Africa brought to you by Africa CDC in partnership with the Mastercard Foundation under the Saving Lives and Livelihoods initiative—a $1.3 billion partnership that is enabling access to COVID-19 vaccinations, and long term health security, for Africa. 

Distributed by  African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Africa CDC.

The Africa CDC
Africa CDC is a specialized technical institution of the African Union that strengthens the capacity and capability of Africa’s public health institutions as well as partnerships to detect and respond quickly and effectively to disease threats and outbreaks, based on data-driven interventions and programmes. Learn more at: http://www.africacdc.org

For media inquiries, please contact:
Cordelia Kwon, Partnership and Communications Associate, The Access Challenge, cordelia.kwon@accesschallenge.org

Raïssa Litete Beyande, Campaign and Promotion Support officer, Africa CDC, LiteteR@africa-union.org

Source : African Media Agency (AMA)

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Is Rapper Digga D Dead Or Alive? Rumors Explained as News of Rapper Stabbing Someone in Dubai

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As per the latest news, Digga D’s name is going viral because of something which is trending on Twitter. Yes, we are talking about Digga D whose name is getting linked to the trading matter on Twitter. A report says that the rapper Digga D reportedly stabbed in Dubai.

Is Digga D Dead Or Alive

People thought this rumour was true because the rapper is in Dubai right now. Here is the complete information that you should know about and get the full updates on the matter.

Is Rapper Digga D Dead Or Alive?

The news has been circulating on Twitter and when people get started knowing about it, they started looking for brief detail. Currently, there are many details available and you should know about them.

When you watch the viral content in which the people saying that he is Digga D rapper stabbing someone. The content went viral within a few moments. The picture is beyond the expectation and you can see it below.

The girl who is appeared in the video has been identified. As per the details, she is Tennessee Thresher who is also in Dubai. She has shared the Instagram story on her Instagram handle on November 28, 2021. However, she has not yet commented on the rumor. While on the other side, Digga also did not share any statement on the rumor and removed his profile picture also.

 

Is Digga D Arrested?

The most recent update from the Dubai Police says that they have arrested the rapper who is an artist in the UK and he is 21 years old. He was arrested as per the rules of Dubai. The police said in this matter that he was arrested because he breached the criminal behavior order. He was also attacked in prison back in 2019.

Digga D’s relationship information is not available completely on the internet. Most probably it is yet to be updated here. We are looking for the information and will add many more things in the upcoming days. There are many things which is important to know about them.





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Widespread vaccination is the best safeguard for our children’s futures – The Maravi Post

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By Dr Jonathan Awori

Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), 29th November 2021 -/African Media Agency (AMA)/- I remember my first COVID-19 patient. She was 16 and I was called to see her after she had been admitted to hospital. Alone in her hospital room, she looked scared. Though I tried to hide it, I was too. I was, after all, knowingly entering the same room as a COVID-positive person. At that time, we knew little about this highly contagious virus, and a vaccine was months away—at best.

What we did know, however, was encouraging for young people. Early data indicated that while young people were as susceptible to the disease as anyone else, they were much less likely to be hospitalized or die from it. Yet there were other costs. Hidden costs.  

Decked out in my personal protective equipment, I remember how hard it was to hear my patient over the hum of the fan in my headgear. I introduced myself and we had a brief chat. Over the next two days, I noticed that she looked forward to our brief check-ins. It was then I realized that she probably felt lonely. Away from her family, she had no-one to talk to, no one to hug, no one to laugh with, or do any of the things that feel human. In the hospital, everyone avoided her room unless necessary. Even when they came in, they tried to keep their distance. Understandably. 

One day, after our brief check in, I reached out for her hand and squeezed it briefly. It was a fleeting moment. And a gloved hand. But I hoped it would mean something to her. I hope it did something to meet the need for human connection.

Those of us in the medical community, often think about COVID-19 in terms of case load and lives lost. From this lens, we can misunderstand the peculiar suffering young people have endured under this pandemic. COVID-19 has cost young people their education, their mental health, their wellbeing, and their hopes. It has dimmed their prospects for economic prosperity. 

Today, widespread vaccination is the best tool we have for saving lives in Africa. The research is clear – vaccines are highly effective, particularly at preventing hospitalization and death. And while many of us see the importance of vaccination for our parents—for the elderly—we also have to appreciate that vaccination is the only way to safeguard our children’s futures. Vaccination is the only way they can resume life, learning, and social interactions. It’s the only way economies can fully and permanently reopen and begin recovering to restore and create opportunities for young people. 

Africa is a predominantly young population, with almost 60 percent of our population under the age of 25. The longer this pandemic drags, the more profound its effects will be on their lives. They have a tremendous stake in this crisis—and we have a responsibility to ensure they are able to live healthy, productive lives, and to set the right example, by getting the vaccine.

This article is part of a series on vaccination in Africa brought to you by Africa CDC in partnership with the Mastercard Foundation under the Saving Lives and Livelihoods initiative—a $1.3 billion partnership that is enabling access to COVID-19 vaccinations, and long term health security, for Africa. 

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Africa CDC.

The Africa CDC
Africa CDC is a specialized technical institution of the African Union that strengthens the capacity and capability of Africa’s public health institutions as well as partnerships to detect and respond quickly and effectively to disease threats and outbreaks, based on data-driven interventions and programmes. Learn more at: http://www.africacdc.org

For media inquiries, please contact:
Cordelia Kwon, Partnership and Communications Associate, The Access Challenge, 
cordelia.kwon@accesschallenge.org 

Raïssa Litete Beyande, Campaign and Promotion Support officer, Africa CDC, LiteteR@africa-union.org

Source : African Media Agency (AMA)

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