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Soaring e-waste affects the health of millions of children, WHO warns – The Maravi Post

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Effective and binding action is urgently required to protect the millions of children, adolescents and expectant mothers worldwide whose health is jeopardized by the informal processing of discarded electrical or electronic devices according to a new ground-breaking report from the World Health Organization: Children and Digital Dumpsites.

“With mounting volumes of production and disposal, the world faces what one recent international forum described as a mounting “tsunami of e-waste”, putting lives and health at risk.” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “In the same way the world has rallied to protect the seas and their ecosystems from plastic and microplastic pollution, we need to rally to protect our most valuable resource –the health of our children – from the growing threat of e-waste.”

As many as 12.9 million women are working in the informal waste sector, which potentially exposes them to toxic e-waste and puts them and their unborn children at risk.

Meanwhile more than 18 million children and adolescents, some as young as 5 years of age, are actively engaged in the informal industrial sector, of which waste processing is a sub-sector. Children are often engaged by parents or caregivers in e-waste recycling because their small hands are more dexterous than those of adults. Other children live, go to school and play near e-waste recycling centres where high levels of toxic chemicals, mostly lead and mercury, can damage their intellectual abilities 

Children exposed to e-waste are particularly vulnerable to the toxic chemicals they contain due to their smaller size, less developed organs and rapid rate of growth and development. They absorb more pollutants relative to their size and are less able to metabolize or eradicate toxic substances from their bodies.

Impact of e-waste on human health

Workers, aiming to recover valuable materials such as copper and gold, are at risk of exposure to over 1,000 harmful substances, including lead, mercury, nickel, brominated flame retardants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

For an expectant mother, exposure to toxic e-waste can affect the health and development of her unborn child for the rest of its life. Potential adverse health effects include negative birth outcomes, such as stillbirth and premature births, as well as low birth weight and length.  Exposure to lead from e-waste recycling activities has been associated with significantly reduced neonatal behavioural neurological assessment scores, increased rates of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), behavioural problems, changes in child temperament, sensory integration difficulties, and reduced cognitive and language scores.

Other adverse child health impacts linked to e-waste include changes in lung function, respiratory and respiratory effects, DNA damage, impaired thyroid function and increased risk of some chronic diseases later in life, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease.

“A child who eats just one chicken egg from Agbogbloshie, a waste site in Ghana, will absorb 220 times the European Food Safety Authority daily limit for intake of chlorinated dioxins,” said Marie-Noel Brune Drisse, the lead WHO author on the report. “Improper e-waste management is the cause.  This is a rising issue that many countries do not recognize yet as a health problem. If they do not act now, its impacts will have a devastating health effect on children and lay a heavy burden on the health sector in the years to come.” 

A rapidly escalating problem

E-waste volumes are surging globally. According to the Global E-waste Statistics Partnership (GESP), they grew by 21% in the five years up to 2019, when 53.6 million metric tonnes of e-waste were generated.  For perspective, last year’s e-waste weighed as much as 350 cruise ships placed end to end to form a line 125km long. This growth is projected to continue as the use of computers, mobile phones and other electronics continues to expand, alongside their rapid obsolescence. 

Only 17.4% of e-waste produced in 2019 reached formal management or recycling facilities, according to the most recent GESP estimates, the rest was illegally dumped, overwhelmingly in low- or middle-income countries, where it is recycled by informal workers.

Appropriate collection and recycling of e-waste is key to protect the environment and reduce climate emissions. In 2019, the GESP found that the 17.4% of e-waste that was collected and appropriately recycled prevented as much as 15 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents from being released into the environment.

Call to Action

Children and Digital Dumpsites calls for effective and binding action by exporters, importers and governments to ensure environmentally sound disposal of e-waste and the health and safety of workers, their families and communities; to monitor e-waste exposure and health outcomes; to facilitate better reuse of materials; and to encourage the manufacture of more durable electronic and electrical equipment.

It also calls on the health community to take action to reduce the adverse health effects from e-waste, by building health sector capacity to diagnose, monitor and prevent toxic exposure among children and women, raising awareness of the potential co-benefits of more responsible recycling, working with affected communities and advocating for better data and health research on the health risks faced by informal e-waste workers.

“Children and adolescents have the right to grow and learn in a healthy environment, and exposure to electrical and electronic waste and its many toxic components unquestionably impacts that right,” said Dr Maria Neira, Director, Department of Environment, Climate Change and Health, at the WHO. “The health sector can play a role by providing leadership and advocacy, conducting research, influencing policy-makers, engaging communities, and reaching out to other sectors to demand that health concerns be made central to e-waste policies.”

 

Note for editors:

A significant proportion of e-waste produced every year is exported from high-income countries to low- and middle-income countries, where there may be a lack of regulation, or where regulation does exist, it may be poorly enforced. Here, e-waste is dismantled, recycled and refurbished in environments where infrastructure, training and environmental and health safeguards may be non-existent or poorly adhered to. This places e-waste workers, their families and communities in greater danger of adverse health effects from e-waste recycling.

The WHO Initiative on E-waste and Child Health, launched in 2013, aims to increase access to evidence, knowledge and awareness of the health impacts of e-waste; improve health sector capacity to manage and prevent risks, track progress and promote e-waste policies that better protect child health; and improve monitoring of exposure to e-waste and the facilitation of interventions that protect public health.

The report was produced with the input and support of the E-Waste Coalition,

a group of 10 UN agencies and international organizations, including the WHO, who have come together to increase collaboration, build partnerships and more efficiently provide support to Member States to address the e-waste challenge.

Sourced from WHO

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Watch Super Queen Grand Premiere 27th November 2021 Full Episode & Contestants Zee Telugu

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Hey entertainment lovers, just gearing up yourself to catch a phenomenal show of Zee Telugu called “Super Queen” which is ready to make your weekend over the top, as the viewers have released the broadcasting date. Ever since the die-hard fans of the Zee Telugu network got acquainted with the promo, their curiosity is hitting the bricks to know everything. So below you can get the comprehensive details, which will help you at the time of catching the telecast because as soon as the time is passing the interest of the audience is enhancing enough.

Super Queen zee Telugu

According to the reports, the broadcasting of “Super Queen” will take place on Sunday 28th November 2021 on Zee Telugu at 12:00 PM. Karthika Masam is a count in the month for the auspicious beginnings, no matter it is a new show, alliance, or something else. So, therefore, the Makers of the show have decided to make the viewers familiarized with the show in the last week of November 2021, as still, a few days are left in the ending of the Karthik Masam. Many surprises are also brought by the makers as well, whose everyone is eagerly waiting for, but still, a few hours are left in telecasting so you will have to wait for a bit.

The makers have been conferred the exclusive promos of the show officially, in which you can watch the glimpse of upcoming activities, which are ready to take place on the stage to make the audience entertained up to the next level. Even the makers are doing such things to enhance the entertainment level so that, viewers could feel tied with them till the end. Even the contestant’s lists have also been shared by the makers, this is the reason everyone is paying attention more to them.

 Super Queen 27th Nov 2021

  • Shiva Jyoti
  • Shobha Shetty,
  • Snigdha
  • Pooja Moorthy
  • Bhanu Shree
  • Sri Satya
  • Madhumita
  • Navya Swamy
  • Lasya Manjunath
  • Yashmi

Here we have mentioned such details about the new show Super Queen and these details will be proven beneficial for you, which streaming the show. These 10 queens will spread the magic of their charm, and make the audience surprised due to their astonishing moves. These contestants will battle against each other to make the title of the show in their name as the winner. When it comes to the special guest so Anupama Parameswaran, Raj Tarun, and Niharika Konidela will be seen a special guests in the show.

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Solomon Islands Tension – The Maravi Post

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8 hours ago

Three bodies were found in a burnt out building in Honiara amid this week’s violence in the capital of the Solomon Islands, Australian media reported. Authorities had put a curfew in place on Friday night in an attempt to stem the unrest and the situation seemed to be calmer on Saturday. But the government showed no signs of addressing the underlying grievances that sparked two days of riots, including concerns about the country’s increasing links with China. Solomon Islands Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare sought to deflect attention from domestic issues by blaming outside interference for stirring up the protesters, with a thinly veiled reference to Taiwan and the United States. Honiara’s Chinatown and its downtown precinct were focuses of rioters, looters and protesters who demanded the resignation of Sogavare, who has been prime minister intermittently since 2000. Sogavare has been widely criticized by leaders of the country’s most populous island of Malaita for a 2019 decision to drop diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favor of mainland China. His government, meanwhile, has been upset over millions in U.S. aid promised directly to Malaita, rather than through the central government. Those issues are just the latest in decades of rivalry between Malaita and Guadalcanal, where the capital, Honiara, is located, said Jonathan Pryke, director of the Sydney-based Lowy Institute think tank’s Pacific Islands program. The Solomon Islands, with a population of about 700,000, are located about 1,500 kilometers (1,000 miles) northeast of Australia.

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Source: Africanews



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Immunology professor talks about the new coronavirus variant – The Maravi Post

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Passengers at Johannesburg’s O.R Tambo airport scrambled this Saturday to find flights to Europe as more and more countries are shutting doors to passengers coming from African countries.

The emergence of the new coronavirus Omicron variant in South Africa sparked a worldwide reaction.

Professor of Immunology Danny Altmann explains.

“I know it feels very harsh to people in South Africa who have really done the right thing and been terribly speedy and vigilant in their reporting. But I just feel that we were so slow to act on Delta and the whole world paid such a high price for it. Let’s try and be forewarned and do it properly this time. So, I think it probably is warranted”, said the academic working at Imperial College London.

Last minute PCR tests are now mandatory.

The UK-based professor believes that vaccination still offers protection against the worst effects of this disease.

“I think it’s a case of kind of hope for the best and fear the worst, isn’t it? So in some ways, if you look at the straight molecular biology limitations, it looks potentially quite a lot scarier even than Delta. And don’t forget, we thought of Delta. I certainly thought Delta as a peak variant, and probably it couldn’t get much worse than that. This looks potentially worse. On the other hand, there’s no reporting from South Africa yet that cases are more severe, and it looks like vaccines may still be doing something because we heard there yesterday that the people in hospital tended to be the unvaccinated people rather than the vaccinated”, said Professor Altmann.

In Africa vaccination rates are significantly lower compared to Europe, the United States and other regions.

According to Professor Altmann, distribution of vaccines throughout Africa is essential to stop future variants.

“You know, in this particular case, if it did come out of Botswana and or South Africa, there has been quite a lot of vaccine available there. But as you say in the African continent as a whole, they’ve been very short of vaccines compared to Europe or North America. And things like this demonstrate how foolhardy that is. We’re just breeding the future variants to come and haunt us. Why do it?”

The latest available data indicate that South Africa has registered almost 3 million cases of Covid-19 and close to 90,000 deaths.

Source: Africanews

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